Sommelier Shalom Chin shares his Thoughts on Piedmont Nebbiolo
A view from Barolo on a clear day

In concluding my tour of Piedmont, it is only fitting to finish up with a grape with small plantings here but it is representative of the region every time one brings up the subject of Piedmont. Nebbiolo needs no introduction. To the locals, Nebbiolo in Piedmont is like what Pinot Noir is to the Burgundians. Read More >

Dolcetto in Piedmont – Not a Sweet Wine
The endless rows of Docletto vines

Our intrepid Singapore Sommelier, Shalom Chin, treks through the hills of Dogliani in Piedmont and discovers some serious Dolcetto. Read More >

Sommelier Shalom Chin on Barbera in Piedmont – the People’s champion
View over the hills of Asti

While Nebbiolo makes up only 3 to 6 precent of the grapes grown in Piedmont, Barbera is the most widely grown grape in Piedmont and second to only to Sangiovese in Italy. This is why it is known as “the people’s wine”. However, like Nebbiolo, this is a grape that is used in many different versions. In Piedmont, there is Barbera d’Alba DOC, Barbera d’Asti DOCG, Barbera del Monferrato DOC and Barbera del Monferrato Superiore DOCG. Read More >

Moscato Mania & the little Rascal
Mount Viso in the background at Mustela just outside Barbaresco and inside Langhe

Moscato – A perception problem

In Piedmont, you cannot go to Asti and leave without tasting Moscato. Moscato di Canelli, known as Frontignac in Australia and as Muscat Blanc à Petit Grains in France, is one of the most widely well-received and loved grapes around the world. At parties, it is easily favoured by new wine drinkers because of its approachability and sweetness. It is bought up in cases by people with a sweet tooth due to its affordability. Wineries produce it because it generates good revenue. The bubbles that usually come with it add joviality to the occasion. However, to seasoned drinkers, it is viewed as a boring and unsophisticated wine, which is predominately sugared grape juice. Read More >

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The Diversity of Piedmont – Our intrepid Singapore sommelier Shalom Chin goes ‘Wandering’ in the hills of Piedmont
A foggy day in Nieve of Barbaresco  This is why they call the grape Nebbiolo because of the fog Nebbia

Although the North-east of Italy is known for its Barolo, Barbaresco, Moscato and Gavi, not many people would expect that Piedmont can produce such a wide array of wines made from international varietals. Read More >

Shalom Chin Rhone Valley Blog – Part 6 – The Tales of Two Terriors – Tavel & Lirac
The tasting room at Domaine de la Mordoree

Final part of the Rhône series

My journey in the Southern Rhône comes to an end at Tavel and Lirac – two towns which are a mere six minutes from each other. There is always more to expound about the riches of the Rhône, such as the areas of Luberon, the Ventoux and the Vaucluse. Domaine Faverot, Domaine de la Citadelle and Domaine de Tara are producers I would recommend for those who are interested in getting a taste of the diversity of the South of South. The flavour profiles there remind me of the punchiness of South Australian wines. However, those finer details would be better-suited for a story in the future. My focus is on Tavel and Lirac. Read More >

The Rise of the English – the New Frontier of Wines and the Wine Pantry in London
A genial atmosphere tasting English wines alfresco at the Wine Pantry

Our Wandering Sommelier, Shalom Chin, investigates the English wine following the trail from the Wine Pantry at Borough Market and out into the field in Kent and Sussex. And he’s impressed with what he sees – read on… Read More >

Sommelier Shalom Chin – Rhone Valley Part 4 – Rasteau & Beaumes-de-Venise – King and Queen of Rhône’s Vin Doux Naturels
The Dentelle de Montmirail protects the  Muscat vines here from the Mistral wind

Part 4 of the Rhône series. My love-affair with both Muscat & Grenache.

My first flirtation with both Muscat and Grenache were both Australians. Over the years, my relationship with Grenache has been steady. I have fond memories drinking heady Grenache made from 100 year-old vines planted in the Barossa Valley. While travelling in France, I encountered both Banyuls and Rasteau. Read More >

Shalom Chin Rhone Valley Part 3 – Gigondas – Joy of the Land
Terraces laid out at high elevation in Gigondas

Part 3 of the Rhône series

If there is a wine that always confuses me as a Châteaunuef-du-Pape (CDP) in a blind tasting, it would be Gigondas. The name has Latin origins and comes from the word jocunditas, meaning joy or pleasantness. Read More >

Sommelier Shalom Chin Blog – Rhone Valley Part 2 – Châteaunuef-du-Pape – The Pope’s New Castle
The terrior of Châteaunuef-du-Pape

Part 2 of the Rhône Series. 12,000 years ago, glaciers melted; ice and water were pushed down south; river rocks were deposited 20 km wide, and Châteaunuef-du-Pape was born. Read More >